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Paul W

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About Paul W

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  1. Hello, I am a non-mason interested in the history of the society and currently engaged in writing a book entitled 'The Secrets of Medieval Master Masons'. One of my chapters which has direct relevance to the society of freemasons is entitled 'Who were (are) the freemasons'. I find it an interesting subject in its historical context - my having little interest in what goes on nowadays. I have attached the mock front cover of my current book project.
  2. I am not a mason, but have been interested in the Fraternity, especially its history for many years. The question as to why Sir Christopher Wren appears to have been 'written out' of official masonic history is an interesting one and as with all historical investigation, not easy to solve to a clear and definitive conclusion. There appears plenty of evidence to indicate that he was an active Freemason prior to 1717, involved with St. Pauls Lodge/Lodge of Antiquity, which met at the Goose & Gridiron, St. Paul's Churchyard, in London. It's said Wren presided over meetings for some 18yrs. It's also said that the trowel and mallet that was used to lay the first stone of the re-built St. Paul's in 1675, was presented to his lodge - so if that be in UGLE' archive/museum, that will bear witness to that claim I guess. Furthermore, why would said items be stored there if he were NOT a Freemason? Those with a better knowledge of Freemasonry than I, will likely know why Wren was removed from his office of Grand Master in 1714 - accused of having 'neglected his role', being replaced by a succession of 'Speculative' GM's. Once Wren was removed from office, it seems to have paved the way for the 'Speculatives' to freely change the design of Freemasonry away from its former 'Operative' focus of building and architecture, to more moral and social virtues.
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