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3GP441

Words and context

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FG all,

One of my interests in Masonry is the language we use in the Ritual and how they have changed.

A good example is Peculiar, nowadays it generally means odd or strange...but at the time the majority of Rituals were established it meant particular or specific, you may have referred to a close confident as 'my peculiar friend' . Thus a Peculiar system meant a specific or defined system.

A second good example is fine.  An example is in the address to the WM : 'In fine, Worshipful Master, by a strict observance of the By-laws of your Lodge, the Constitution of Masonry.....'
I have heard this pronounced 'fee-nay' as if it were Latin, however it is an obsolete word meaning conclusion or finish, hence 'In conclusion, Worshipful Master.....'.

Does anyone else out there enjoy this aspect of Masonry and have a good example of a word or phrase that we use in a different manner to the popular world?

(Did you see what I did there?)


S&F

Jon West

PM,PZ etc

Edited by 3GP441

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"Just" is often orated incorrectly during ritual.  Its meaning being that of correct, exact or morally right.  The misuse is more commonly during the 2nd degree Passing questions, working tools and Installation when the WM appoints his officers for the year.  

 

Similarly with "Try" as in Try and adjust.  It doesn't mean to attempt to adjust, it means to check so should be a slight pause before and adjust.

Edited by Sentience
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Yes, I produce and publish a brief glossary card of some seventy words used in a peculiar fashion in the Craft which are unusual these days or have changed their meanings and/or pronunciations over time.  I give a copy to every EA that I encounter.

A couple of examples:

hele - to hide, cover from view. Historically pronounced so as to rhyme with conceal,
reveal. See The Freemason at Work, Harry Carr; op. cit. See also Freemasons’
Guide and Compendium
, Bernard E Jones; pub Harrap.

try - in the sense of ‘testing’ rather than ‘attempting’. e.g. ‘. . . try, - and adjust . . .’

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1 minute ago, Sentience said:

"Just" is often orated incorrectly during ritual.  Its meaning being that of correct, exact or morally right.  The misuse is more commonly during the 2nd degree Passing questions, working tools and Installation when the WM appoints his officers for the year.  

It is explained fully in the Lectures and also in the Irish Constitution Ritual where it a Lodge is defined as being Just because the VSL is open on the Altar.

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7 minutes ago, Trouillogan said:

Yes, I produce and publish a brief glossary card of some seventy words used in a peculiar fashion in the Craft which are unusual these days or have changed their meanings and/or pronunciations over time.  I give a copy to every EA that I encounter.

A couple of examples:

hele - to hide, cover from view. Historically pronounced so as to rhyme with conceal,
reveal. See The Freemason at Work, Harry Carr; op. cit. See also Freemasons’
Guide and Compendium
, Bernard E Jones; pub Harrap.

try - in the sense of ‘testing’ rather than ‘attempting’. e.g. ‘. . . try, - and adjust . . .’

Again the Irish Ritual is explicit on this point, referring to the old word 'helan' to cover ( I am a member of an IC degree demo team).

BTW I still have youngish children, so I am familiar with having my patience tried and proved!

S&F

Jon

Edited by 3GP441
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On 10/27/2018 at 4:32 PM, 3GP441 said:

I have heard this pronounced 'fee-nay' as if it were Latin, however it is an obsolete word meaning conclusion or finish, hence 'In conclusion, Worshipful Master.....'.

Er, "in fine" is Latin, meaning "in, or at, the end, finally".

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On 10/27/2018 at 4:50 PM, 3GP441 said:

It is explained fully in the Lectures and also in the Irish Constitution Ritual where it a Lodge is defined as being Just because the VSL is open on the Altar.

Not everyone bothers with the green book, but there are plenty of experienced Masons in Lodges who should be pointing out the correct use of the words.

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15 hours ago, DavidGoode said:

Er, "in fine" is Latin, meaning "in, or at, the end, finally".

It is not printed in italics in most Rituals that I have read I therefore assumed the archaic English use from around the time that the Rituals were first written.

Ipso facto my postulation!

S&F

 

Jon

 

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39 minutes ago, 3GP441 said:

It is not printed in italics in most Rituals that I have read I therefore assumed the archaic English use from around the time that the Rituals were first written.

Ipso facto my postulation!

S&F

 

Jon

 

Taylor's has "Finally"!

Barry

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